Alison painting.jpg
Summer Reflections Llyn Gwynant.jpg
IMG_20170311_135004.jpg
Charlie Framed.jpg
DSC_0176.JPG
CROP A Bright Afternoon North Wales Benjamin Williams Leader.jpg
SAR-11-193-OUTPUT-UNCLASS-10.jpg
Alison painting.jpg

Alison Bradley Gallery


The essence of Snowdonia, North Wales, and Chester

SCROLL DOWN

Alison Bradley Gallery


The essence of Snowdonia, North Wales, and Chester

 

Snowdonia and North Wales art, rural art, equestrian and horse racing art, and coastal art - Welsh art direct from the artist's galleries in Betws-y-coed and Chester

 

North Wales artist Alison Bradley's oil paintings, charcoal drawings, and prints capture the essence of Snowdonia, North Wales, and Chester - the majestic landscape of mountains and lakes, the loyal friendship of farmer and sheepdog, the sweeping coastal vistas, and the energy of horse racing at Chester and Bangor-on-Dee Racecourses.

Alison Bradley opened her first art gallery in 2008 in the North Wales village of Betws-y-coed - the Gateway to Snowdonia and home of Britain’s first Artists’ Colony from 1844 to 1914. In 2016, this was joined by her second gallery in the heart of historic Chester City Centre.

In both galleries you will find a selection of Alison’s oil paintings and charcoal drawings. Her subjects cover the landscape of Snowdonia and North Wales, Wirral, the Borders, Chester, Equestrian and Racing, Animals and Rural Life, and the Coast. In addition to her original works we also display a range of reproduction prints and greetings cards.

 
Summer Reflections Llyn Gwynant.jpg

The Galleries


Collections of original oil paintings, original charcoal drawings, and faithful reproduction prints

The Galleries


Collections of original oil paintings, original charcoal drawings, and faithful reproduction prints

 

In our online galleries you will find details of Alison's originals and reproduction prints sorted by subject, and her greetings cards and mini-prints. We have also included a gallery of Alison's older work that is still available.

"Alison delicately captures a moment in time, the light dancing across its subject. Whatever appears on the canvas - mountain, coastline, bustling street, or a farmer and his dog - Alison's real subject is the light."

IMG_20170311_135004.jpg

Framed Pictures by Post


Ready to hang, direct to your door

Framed Pictures by Post


Ready to hang, direct to your door

 

We are now able to send framed originals and prints by post to most destinations worldwide.

Charlie Framed.jpg

Fine Bespoke Picture Framing


The essential finishing touch

Fine Bespoke Picture Framing


The essential finishing touch

 

Picture framing is all carried out in house, and we offer the service for your own pictures as well as Alison’s work. We have a wide selection of wooden frame mouldings including some of the very finest premium mouldings from Spain and Italy, and swept frames handmade in the UK. Our speciality is hand finished solid oak frames, and we have growing range of oak mouldings of our own design, exclusively available at Alison Bradley Gallery. Alison’s pictures are all mounted in pure cotton board, giving the highest quality finish and maximum protection to the artwork, and we now only use the highest quality specialist art glass for glazed pictures.

DSC_0176.JPG

Visit our Galleries


Find us in Betws-y-coed and Chester - two fabulous locations

Visit our Galleries


Find us in Betws-y-coed and Chester - two fabulous locations

Betws-y-coed

The Gateway to Snowdonia

Betws-y-coed is a beautiful Alpinesque village sitting at the confluence of the Rivers Conwy, Llugwy, and Lledr in Snowdonia. It was the home of Britain's first Artists' Colony from 1844 to 1914 before developing into the popular tourist destination it is today. Whether you prefer a day out in the fresh mountain air or something less energetic, Betws-y-coed is the ideal year-round destination for a day out or short break.

Welcome to Alison Bradley Gallery Betws-y-coed.

Chester

Historic Roman City

Located on the Welsh border, Chester is one of the North-West's principal destinations. The City was established by the Romans in the first century A.D. and today is internationally famous for attractions including its Roman Amphitheatre, intact City Walls, a unique selection of independent retailers at street level and in the Mediæval Rows, and Britain's oldest racecourse - the Roodee, which hosted its first horse race in 1539.

Welcome to Alison Bradley Gallery Chester.

Alison Bradley Gallery Betws-y-coed

Alison Bradley Gallery Betws-y-coed

Alison Bradley Gallery Chester

Alison Bradley Gallery Chester

CROP A Bright Afternoon North Wales Benjamin Williams Leader.jpg

The Betws-y-coed Artists' Colony


Britain's first Artists' Colony from 1844 to 1914

The Betws-y-coed Artists' Colony


Britain's first Artists' Colony from 1844 to 1914

The Betws-y-coed Artists' Colony

Britain's first Artists' Colony from 1844 to 1914

Betws-y-coed was the home of Britain's first artists' colony, and Alison follows a long line of artists who have been drawn to the village and influenced by the landscape of Snowdonia and North Wales.

During the Napoleonic wars of the late 18th and early 19th Century, British artists were unable to travel to the Alps and so started to explore the United Kingdom. J. M. W. Turner visited North Wales in 1790, and during the 19th Century as it became fashionable to paint wild mountainous landscapes, more artists followed in his footsteps.

In the summer of 1844 renowned artist and contemporary of Turner, David Cox, made his first of many summer visits to Betws-y-coed. In this same year, Thomas Roscoe's book "Wanderings and Excursions in North Wales" was re-published including a chapter on Betws-y-coed. Before long the village had become a destination of choice for artists, with Cox encouraging his younger followers with regular demonstrations.

The years from 1850 to 1880 saw the Conwy Valley established as a firm favourite location for a new generation of landscape painters, and so Britain's first artists' colony was born. In 1851 Manchester-based H Clarence Whaite first arrived in Betws-y-coed, meeting George Popkin and later befriending James Whittaker. Also in the village during the following years were artists such as Thomas Collier, John Syer, Benjamin Williams Leader, Lawrence Coppard, and George Harrison.

During the 1860s the construction of the Conwy Valley Railway brought vast numbers of tourists and artists to Betws-y-coed, attracted by the growing reputation of the village. To cope with the influx of visitors the Royal Oak Hotel, so often the base for David Cox's expeditions, was rebuilt and a number of guest houses - Welsh owned but with English names - were constructed. As the village grew several Alpine-style villas were built by prosperous English people, and within a few years the artists of the colony were in despair that the peace and solemnity that had attracted them to Betws-y-coed in the first place had been destroyed by the tourism that the village's reputation had given rise to.

As Betws-y-coed became busier and more commercialised the artists began to migrate along the Conwy Valley, and around 1870 Clarence Whaite took occupancy of Tyddyn Cynal near Conwy. In 1881 at the Llandudno Junction Hotel a meeting of artists including Clarence Whaite resolved to establish a Welsh art academy. One year later, Queen Victoria bestowed the title Royal upon the Cambrian Academy of Art, an institution that still exists today as the RCA in Conwy.

References/Further reading: Clarence Whaite and the Welsh Art World, The Betws-y-coed Artists Colony 1844-1914 by Peter Lord. Available from the Royal Oak Hotel, Betws-y-coed, where you will also find one of David Cox’s original paintings “The Royal Oak”.

Top picture: "A Bright Afternoon, North Wales" by Benjamin Williams Leader

SAR-11-193-OUTPUT-UNCLASS-10.jpg

Help for Heroes


Support for our wounded

Help for Heroes


Support for our wounded

Shortly after we opened in 2008 we contacted the then very new charity Help for Heroes to see if we could help raise some money to help support the men and women who were returning from conflict with life-changing injuries. In the years that followed we watched Help for Heroes grow, and saw first hand how they worked to rebuild shattered lives and support families through very difficult times to a brighter future.

The Afghanistan deployment ended in 2014 but sadly Help for Heroes' services are still very much required as the focus moves more towards the invisible wounds that can take years to present symptoms. The staff and volunteers at Help for Heroes are an awesome bunch of people and we are very proud to continue supporting them.

Help for Heroes is there for all Armed Forces personnel and veterans. If you're reading this and think that you or someone you know needs help, please read about how to get support.